Apr 232013
 

For the third and final day of my Angkor ticket, I again set out by bike. Only this time, unlike day #1, I didn’t go granny-style. I rented a proper high-end mountain bike – complete with gears, shocks, and disc breaks. The goal wasn’t just to sightsee; today would be a day of full-output exercise under the blazing Cambodian sun, covering as much ground and burning as many calories as my legs would allow.

By the time I collapsed on my bed at about 7pm I’d ridden 80km in all – plus the hiking, scrambling, climbing, and photographing in between. For as exhausting as it was, it might have been my favorite day of them all.




Note: These posts are behind realtime; the above took place in March, 2012.

  15 Responses to “Exploring Angkor: Rural Cambodia By Bike”

  1. Now that is a proper mountain bike, very proper considering you were in Cambodia! I would shred that baby!

    Incredible day. I really wish I could experience this. You have guts straying that far from civilization, what if you ran into some rebels?

    LOL @ the kid with his hands in his pants. The kids are all really cute and it is amazing how “civilized” they are, with sharing and their desire for learning and human interaction. They are setting an example for youth in many other “civilized” parts of the world.

    Technology has changed the way I travel, too, and I also consider GPS absolutely vital now. I am no longer a lost tourist asking for directions or relying on others to transport me when I visit new cities. I can immediately navigate like a local and it is amazing to never feel lost.

    I am kind of amazed that some of the palm trees in Cambodia look identical to Florida palms.

    • >>Incredible day. I really wish I could experience this.

      You can! If you want to, why couldn’t you? šŸ˜‰

      >>what if you ran into some rebels?

      I’ve never heard of issues with rebels in Cambodia… šŸ˜›

      >>can immediately navigate like a local and it is amazing to never feel lost.

      Absolutely. When my iPhone got stolen on my first day in Vietnam – and I had to travel the whole country without one – it really emphasized just how crippling it is not to have it. All that extra time spent fumbling with maps or digging through guidebooks or trying to figure out why things don’t match up…

  2. Wow! That is some serious biking. I am surprised because I never really considered you to be a cyclist. That shot of your legs / feet is awesome, and explains things very well šŸ˜‰

  3. >>By the time I collapsed on my bed at about 7pm Iā€™d ridden 80km in all ā€“ plus the hiking, scrambling, climbing, and photographing in between. For as exhausting as it was, it might have been my favorite day of them all.

    That’s what I’m talking about

  4. amazing pics and great story. Very much enjoyed. thanks for sharing with all of us šŸ™‚

  5. Great story about the selfless kids! šŸ™‚

  6. thinking of staying my whole visa span in a rural community in Cambodia when i head to Phnom Penh this wednesday

  7. since you’ve been on the countryside, any suggestion on where is it best? also looking at staying with a family or perhaps an available traditional wooden house, no matter how siimple it is, and stay there for the span of my visa (or perhaps even longer by coming back after a visa run).

    • Sorry, not really; I only stayed in proper hotels in the cities, and ventured out by bike/foot. Although I love exploring far & wide, I’m much pickier about where I actually stay for the sake of being able to program comfortably.

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